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Importance of a Proper Running Pace

running pace

 

Being aware of your running pace and pacing yourself properly are key to running success. Whether you’re going for a Personal Record or simply trying a new distance, knowing how to pace yourself will make you a better runner.

 

 

According to the Runner’s World article, “Proper Pacing Will Make You a Better Runner”, recreational runners overestimate or underestimate their pace by 32-40 seconds per mile! Anyone who has done even the slightest bit of running knows that’s not an insignificant amount of time. Having a good handle on your running pace will not only give you insight into your performance but will make you an overall better runner. But how do you know exactly how to pace yourself?

In “Proper Pacing Will Make You a Better Runner”, Runner’s World provided tips for achieving your ideal running pace.

  • Ease In – Don’t go full force right away. ease into your running pace even during short runs when you may be tempted to push yourself to go faster right off the bat. In fact, the shorter the event the longer your warmup should be.
  • Practice Different Paces – To really learn your best running pace, it’s important to try a variety of different speeds. Don’t get caught up in the extremes of running your fastest or taking it easy. Mix it up and learn how your body reactions to a range of paces.
  • Train by Feel – Ignore the GPS and learn to control your running pace simply by how your body is performing. Listen to your breathing and use your breathing tempo to help pace yourself.
  • Stay on It – Don’t lose focus and zone out as the race or run begins to drag on. The best runners are constantly listening to their body and adjusting their pace as needed, whether at mile 2 or mile 20.

Visit RunnersWorld.com to read their full article and get even more insight into how to become a better runner with a proper running pace.

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